The Referendum Battle Lines are Now Drawn

The Referendum Battle Lines are Now Drawn

The referendum battle lines are now drawn but most people are still unsure about how to decide which side they are on. The EU Referendum date has been set for 23rd June.The polls are relatively close on how people intend to vote in the referendum but 42% of voters who have even declared to pollsters their voting intentions are open to changing. Moreover, the undecideds are key with around a fifth of voters not having made up their minds.

According to pollsters a quarter of voters think Britain is on the wrong track, are worried about immigration, and think we should definitely go.

One in seven think differently. They are optimistic for the UK, believe staying in the EU is a bigger risk than leaving, and think we’d do better in the global economy outside the EU.

Just over one in ten are happy with life, optimistic for Britain, positive about immigration, and think leaving would be too big a risk.

The remaining tenth are amongst the most committed to staying in the EU, they value free movement and having human rights guaranteed by Europe.

However it is three other groups who are most important to the outcome.

One in seven are undecided how to vote but think leaving sounds like a bigger risk than staying, and could be persuaded by a strong lead from the PM. These are people for whom a decision by Boris could be important.

The other two groups are those for whom immigration issues is most critical.

It is generally thought that immigration is the issue which turns most people against the EU. However, about 23% of voters are skeptical. They do not believe that leaving the EU would change immigration levels into the country.

One in eight of those polled believing we won’t be able to solve problems like immigration whether we’re in or out, so might as well avoid the risk of changing.

One in five are less fixed. They worry about their own prospects but are not sure whether problems like immigration will be dealt with better inside or outside the EU.At the moment the leave campaigns are talking to themselves too much. In a world where political discourse is conducted within the echo chamber of social media it is critical that the campaigns speak with the undecided voters rather than with themselves.

Simon Quarendon

Simon Quarendon

As the consultancy’s Chairman, Simon has strategic oversight of all clients. His career in communications spans 28 years, during which time he has held senior management positions in some of the UK’s leading PR agencies.

During his career, Simon has advised numerous blue chip clients and has worked on a number of large scale communications programmes. Simon has extensive international experience and was a previous Secretary General of the International Communications Consultancy Organisation (ICCO), a trade association representing over 1,000 PR agencies in 28 countries.
Simon Quarendon

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About the Author

As the consultancy’s Chairman, Simon has strategic oversight of all clients. His career in communications spans 28 years, during which time he has held senior management positions in some of the UK’s leading PR agencies. During his career, Simon has advised numerous blue chip clients and has worked on a number of large scale communications programmes. Simon has extensive international experience and was a previous Secretary General of the International Communications Consultancy Organisation (ICCO), a trade association representing over 1,000 PR agencies in 28 countries.